Show Navigation
Show Menu

2024 Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft: 1-QB

By Kevin English | Updated on Sat, 13 Apr 2024 . 1:13 PM EDT
Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft: How High Will Brock Bowers Go in 1-QB Format?

Marvin Harrison Jr. ... But Then What?

Chances are, you have a dynasty rookie draft coming up.

It might even start before the NFL Draft, when player landing spots are a mystery.

That's why we assembled the Draft Sharks staff to play out a five-round dynasty rookie mock draft (1-QB).

So, how'd it all unfold behind Marvin Harrison Jr.? 

Let's dig in ...

Editor's Note: A previous version of this article ran through a three-round dynasty rookie mock draft. The DS staff reconvened to draft two additional rounds on March 22.

Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft – Round 1

1.01 – Marvin Harrison Jr., WR, Ohio State

Alex Korff: Your coworker might have gotten their job through nepotism, but it is not why Harrison is a projected top 5 NFL Draft pick.

Ja’Marr Chase is the only WR in our database with a higher rookie model score.

Harrison is in a tier of his own in 1-QB drafts. Check out our full profile for more on Harrison's dynasty value.

1.02 – Malik Nabers, WR, LSU

Kevin English: Nabers broke out for 72-1,017-3 as a 19-year-old true sophomore. His game hit another level in 2023, when Nabers finished top-3 nationwide in receiving yards and TDs.

Nabers projects as a top-8 NFL Draft pick with no major flaws.

1.03 – Rome Odunze, WR, Washington

Matt Schauf: It's close enough between Odunze and Brock Bowers that I'd be willing to let team need affect the decision. If I'm not already set with a good (and at least young-ish) TE, then I'm willing to bet on Bowers becoming a true difference-maker.

For this mock, I'll go Odunze -- who doesn't seem like he should be separated much from Nabers. Odunze broke out at 19, delivered big numbers each of the past two years, and tested very well.

He's not a lock for big NFL production but carries WR1 potential.

http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">

Draft With Data -- Not Feelings.

1.04 – Brock Bowers, TE, Georgia

Shane Hallam: Bowers' dynamic ability as a runner and receiver makes him worth a top-5 rookie pick.

He could easily re-create Sam LaPorta's rookie season in a pass-heavy offense.

We dug further into Bowers' dynasty outlook in this profile.

1.05 – Brian Thomas Jr., WR, LSU

Jared Smola: Thomas exploded for 1,177 yards and 17 TDs as a junior last year -- despite battling Malik Nabers for targets.

Then he earned a 99th-percentile Relative Athletic Score at the Combine, highlighted by a 4.33-second 40 time at 6'3 and 209 pounds.

He's widely expected to be the fourth WR off the board in this stacked class and has WR1-level fantasy upside.

1.06 – Caleb Williams, QB, USC

C.H. Herms: Even in a 1-QB format, I'm still looking to land Williams early. A player with his kind of ceiling can be a difference-maker and create a positional advantage.

Our full profile digs deeper into Williams' dynasty value.

1.07 – Adonai Mitchell, WR, Texas

Matt: This is where I start shopping the pick in trades if the draft opens this way.

Mitchell's fine. But he also never led a college team in receptions or receiving yards. After two quiet years at Georgia, he transferred to Texas and caught 20 fewer balls than Xavier Worthy.

I'm picking him here assuming Mitchell goes fifth among WRs in the NFL Draft. If that proves not to be the case, I'm open to taking whichever WR does go ahead of him.

1.08 – Xavier Worthy, WR, Texas

Kevin: Worthy burst on the national scene as a freshman, tallying team highs in receptions (62), receiving yards (981), and TDs (12).

We knew about the speed heading into the NFL Combine, but he turned heads by setting a Combine record with a 4.21-second 40 time.

If a team can look past Worthy’s size (5’11, 165) and play-strength limitations, he could quickly deliver some explosive fantasy lines in the NFL. 

1.09 – Troy Franklin, WR, Oregon

Shane: I really want to see the draft capital for Franklin to feel confident taking him this early in a rookie draft. The production and pedigree are certainly there, but poor Combine drills make Franklin a scary bet.

I'm in if an NFL team takes him among the top 50 picks -- even if his main role is a Gabe Davis-like deep threat.

There is a possibility of a big fall for Franklin in the draft, though.

1.10 – Jonathon Brooks, RB, Texas

Kevin: Prior to a November ACL tear, Brooks looked on track to be the RB1 in this class. Maybe that still happens. Regardless, I’ll take a shot on a 21-year-old (in July) with lead-back size and a three-down skill set. 

1.11 – Jayden Daniels, QB, LSU

Jared: I don't believe any remaining RB, WR, or TE is a good bet to be a true impact fantasy asset. Daniels certainly has that potential. He was excellent throwing deep at LSU and reminds me of Lamar Jackson as a runner.

If he hits, he's a top-5 fantasy QB, with upside to the top of the position.

1.12 – Drake Maye, QB, UNC

Matt: I need NFL Draft capital to help sort the WRs in this range. What I see now is a jumble of guys with some intrigue but plenty of questions.

Throw in an unexciting group of RBs, and I'm OK with taking a shot on this dual-threat QB.

Maye delivered a nearly 4-1 TD-INT ratio as a passer, while racking up 1,209 yards and 16 TDs on the ground for his UNC career. Our full profile dives deeper into his dynasty value.

TIP

Playing in a multi-QB dynasty league? View our recent dynasty superflex rookie mock draft.

 

Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft – Round 2

2.01 – Ladd McConkey, WR, Georgia

Alex: McConkey had a really solid showing at the Senior Bowl and NFL Combine that validated his decent college production. McConkey possesses the athleticism, football IQ, and overall ability to get him on the field.

We are projecting him to be a PPR asset.

2.02 – Blake Corum, RB, Michigan

Herms: Despite being a slightly undersized and older (23) prospect, Corum shows enough on film to be a nice change-of-pace back.

2.03 – Trey Benson, RB, Florida State

Kevin: Benson overcame a horrific 2020 knee injury at Oregon.

Over the past two seasons at Florida State, he tallied 1,896 yards and 23 TDs on 6.1 yards per carry.

Benson brings the size and pass-catching ability to eventually see starting-level work in the NFL. He’s likely to go on Day 2 of the draft.

2.04 – J.J. McCarthy, QB, Michigan

Herms: We're looking at a pretty significant tier drop at this point in the draft. I don't mind taking swings on QBs when no other clearer options are available.

There's some major smoke around McCarthy going among the top 10 of the NFL Draft. Scooping a share of him here presents solid value.

Check out McCarthy's full profile for more.

2.05 – Keon Coleman, WR, Florida State

Jared: I don't expect to end up with much Coleman in dynasty rookie drafts. I'm trying to wean myself off of big-bodied, contested-catch receivers who struggle to create separation (the name "J.J. Arcega-Whiteside" still gives me nightmares).

But this feels like a fine spot to take a shot on a 6'3, 215-pounder who scored on 16.5% of his college catches.

2.06 – Ricky Pearsall, WR, Florida

Kevin: Pearsall was the biggest mover in analyst Daniel Jeremiah’s latest top 50, rising 9 spots to No. 39.

I think he’s more of a late Round 2 NFL pick, but his route polish and sure hands give him a chance to contribute immediately. 

2.07 – Braelon Allen, RB, Wisconsin

Matt: I don't like that Allen skipped running the 40 at the Combine and his pro day. That makes me wonder if he was afraid of putting up an Audric Estime-level time (4.71 seconds).

But Allen comes off a nice three-year college run that included averaging 5.9 yards per carry. He looks like he'll be limited as a receiver but did rack up 28 receptions in 2023.

Allen's decision to leave school early also suggests he got positive reviews on his expected draft position.

In a weak RB class, he's a shot worth taking in this range. That'll change, though, if he slides well into Day 3 of the NFL Draft.

2.08 – Roman Wilson, WR, Michigan

Alex: Wilson pops on film, and his analytical profile is fairly strong. Our rookie model specifically calls out players who are statistically better on film than analytically, so I always watch those WRs closely.

A decent-sized slot receiver with some success in the return game is often a solid bet for NFL production.

If his route-running improves, he can thrive at the next level.

2.09 – Jaylen Wright, RB, Tennessee

Shane: Wright showed off his 4.3 speed at the Combine, but he is more than just a home run threat.

Wright's ability to stack opposing LBs and manipulate their positioning to create bigger plays is a special trait required in the NFL. With his intelligence and athleticism, he torched some of the SEC's toughest defenses in Georgia and Kentucky this past season.

Though Tennessee didn't ask him to do much in the receiving game, Wright showed at the Combine he is a natural hands catcher. With some improvements to his vision and cutback ability, Wright has RB1 upside in the NFL.

2.10 – Ja'Tavion Sanders, TE, Texas

Jared: He'd be getting more love if Brock Bowers wasn't stealing all the thunder in this TE class. Sanders topped 600 receiving yards as both a sophomore and junior, averaging a strong 13.1 yards per catch.

Not even 21 yet, Sanders should still have tons of room for growth.

2.11 – MarShawn Lloyd, RB, USC

Shane: He has all the traits you want in a starting NFL RB. That includes size, speed, and an 8.57 RAS.

Despite the lack of college production, Lloyd's pedigree as a recruit shows the potential.

If he can get fourth-round draft capital in an open situation, his ceiling is high.

2.12 – Xavier Legette, WR, South Carolina

Matt: Legette's final college season (71-1255-7 receiving line) was fantastic. And then his Combine testing lined up (4.39-second 40 time at 6'1, 221 pounds).

So why didn't he go earlier in this mock? Because Legette didn't catch more than 18 balls in a season until his fifth year at South Carolina. Four quiet years plus a late breakout is a significant red flag for a prospect.

The end of Round 2, however, is plenty late enough to buy the upside and not worry about the risk. If Legette doesn't work out at this draft cost, you'll be OK.

TIP

Looking for a place to play dynasty? Check out this review of the Best Fantasy Football Sites.

 

Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft – Round 3

3.01 – Malachi Corley, WR, Western Kentucky

Shane: Corley's college production and do-it-all ability makes me comfortable that he earns some type of NFL role.

Corley presents a varied skill set like Jayden Reed last year. If he can get the Day 2 draft capital, Corley could rise to the second round of rookie drafts.

3.02 – Ja'Lynn Polk, WR, Washington

Alex: Polk is a prototypically sized wideout who had a productive college career. He's a physical receiver who will need to refine his route-running in the NFL.

Big plays and winning contested catches will help him get drafted, but it won’t be enough to make him fantasy-relevant without some progression.

One of the factors I watch in the model is agreement factor, which compares a prospect's athleticism, film, and production scores. A high agreement means the prospect scored similarly in all fields.

Polk has an agreement factor of 3.8, well above average for the position and draft class overall.

3.03 – Devontez Walker, WR, UNC

Jared: Walker broke out as a sophomore at Kent State and then averaged 87 yards and 0.9 TDs per game at North Carolina last year.

His 193-pound frame might limit his utility as a pro, but Walker's sub-4.4 speed gives him exciting big-play upside.

3.04 – Bucky Irving, RB, Oregon

Shane: The Combine was pretty awful for Irving at his size (though he improved his vertical at his Pro Day). Still, his short-area quickness and explosiveness will trump his long speed.

Similar in size to Kyren Williams, Irving could outperform his draft position.

3.05 – Ray Davis, RB, Kentucky

Herms: Like Blake Corum, Davis is a shorter prospect (5'8). But he's stout enough to be a solid committee contributor at the next level.

Davis also displayed some nice hands as a receiver at the Senior Bowl. It's all about landing upside guys at this point in the draft.

3.06 – Audric Estime, RB, Notre Dame

Jared: His slow 4.71-second 40 time drew the headlines. But Estime crushed in the vertical and broad jumps and actually earned an above-average RAS.

There's still a chance for Estime to emerge as the lead ball carrier in an NFL committee. His 221-pound frame could be especially valuable near the goal line.

3.07 – Bo Nix, QB, Oregon

Herms: I can't pass up the opportunity to land a potential NFL starter this late.

Should Nix land in a solid situation, he could turn into a worthwhile trade chip if you don't need him to start for your team.

3.08 – Will Shipley, RB, Clemson

Alex: Shipley was an offensive weapon for the Clemson Tigers, racking up solid rushing, receiving, and return yardages over his three colligate years.

He is too small to be a conventional workhorse, but his versatility will help him find a spot on an NFL roster.

According to PFF, his pass blocking is suspect and could be a concern for his playing time. But his well-rounded profile (agreement factor of 4.5) is worth a dart throw in Round 3.

3.09 – Jermaine Burton, WR, Alabama

Kevin: Burton brings just decent size, but he’s a top-end athlete (9.06 RAS). He also led the Crimson Tide in receiving yards each of the past two seasons.

There’s a chance he sneaks into Round 3 come April, even in a strong WR class.  

3.10 – Isaiah Davis, RB, South Dakota State

Matt: Davis delivered impressive efficiency for his college career. He averaged 6.7 yards per carry, three seasons (among four) with at least 100.1 yards per game, and 51 total TDs.

Davis scored on 7.4% of his career rushes and closed his run with a pair of workhorse-type seasons. He also delivered elite numbers in yards after contact, elusive rating, PFF rushing grade.

I was hoping Davis would test faster, but the 4.57-second 40 time at 218 pounds gives him a 66th-percentile speed score for the position. He carries some sleeper potential in a shaky RB class.

3.11 – Ben Sinnott, TE, Kansas State

Alex: Sinnott is an athletic freak (9.49 RAS) who walked on at K-state. He lettered in FIVE sports in high school and was named to the all-state team as a TE, WR, and DE by the Iowa Print Sports Writers Association.

He is an athlete. Throw him on a taxi squad and see what happens.

3.12 – Dillon Johnson, RB, Washington

Herms: Johnson didn't wow anyone with his 4.68-second 40 time at the Combine. But he does have the requisite build (6'0, 217 pounds) and produced as a runner and receiver in college.

It took the 2023 transfer to Washington for Johnson to exceed 89 carries for the first time. But he racked up 149 receptions across his three seasons at Mississippi State.

Mediocre yardage efficiency -- 5.2 per rush and 6.1 per catch for his career -- align with that slow 40 time. But Johnson's a solid dart throw at this level, while we await his draft capital.

Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft – Round 4

4.01 – Theo Johnson, TE, Penn State

Jared: Johnson hits the NFL with underwhelming college production. But he's a freakish athlete, posting a 4.57-second 40 time and 39.5-inch vertical at 6'6 and 259 pounds.

That makes him an upside shot worth taking in the fourth round of rookie drafts.

4.02 – Jacob Cowing, WR, Arizona

Shane: Cowing's footwork in his routes is among the best in the class, a trait that translates well to the NFL. He knows how to get open in man coverage and was able to do that consistently throughout his college career.

Despite being lighter, I can see Cowing earning an NFL role and outperforming his draft position.

4.03 – Malik Washington, WR, Virginia

Alex: Washington is a 5’8, 191-pound WR who was very productive coming out of Virginia. He projects as a slot or gadget-style player with the chance for an upside if he can improve his route running. He had excellent film scores (93rd percentile), great production (86th percentile), and solid athleticism (77th percentile). Ignoring projected draft capital, he would be the WR7 in the model. However, draft capital is pretty sticky as an indicator, and Washington is projected to go in the 3rd round of the NFL draft.

If you are drafting right now, I love targeting his upside in the 4th round of rookie drafts.

4.04 – Jalen McMillan, WR, Washington

Kevin: McMillan broke out in 2022 with 79-1,098-9. Playing an extra game, he beat Rome Odunze in catches (by 4) and TDs (by 2). 2023 marked a step back, hurt by an early-season knee injury. Still, his size (6’1, 197) and athleticism (9.33 RAS) provides a chance to stick in the pros.

4.05 – Isaac Guerendo, RB, Louisville

Herms: Guerendo running a 4.33 40 time at the NFL Combine at 221 pounds was an eye-popping piece of information. He didn't produce a ton during his time at Louisville, but I'll take a chance on a stellar athlete here in the early fourth.

4.06 – Michael Penix Jr., QB, Washington

Matt: If Penix lands in a spot with potential starting opportunity, he'll probably leave the board earlier than this. He's not a thrilling real-life or fantasy prospect, with a lack of rushing ability limiting his dynasty ceiling. But he balled out across two years at Washington (67 TDs vs. 19 INTs) and seems likely to get a shot at starting some time early in his NFL career.

4.07 – Brenden Rice, WR, USC

Alex: Rice is a big WR (6’2” and 208 pounds) with above-average route running. He had a solid overall analytical profile with slightly below-average athleticism scores (48th percentile). His agreement factor (4.0) is well above average, meaning all fields in the model agreed on his (good) potential.

An indicator I like to use in later-round WR picks is if their normalized film scores are significantly higher than their analytical scores. Rice checks that box. Keep an eye on him in the 4th round of your rookie drafts.

4.08 – Johnny Wilson, WR, Florida State

Shane: Unique player at his size (6'6, 231), but the athleticism is there to be a red zone weapon and potentially more.

The 4th round is the perfect time to take outliers like this and see if you can strike gold.

4.09 – Kimani Vidal, RB, Troy

Herms: Despite being an undersized back at 5'8, there's a lot to like about Vidal. He displayed solid pass-catching skills at the Senior Bowl and has all of the making of a change-of-pace back in the right situation.

It also helps that Vidal's issues are more height related than weight; a 215-pound frame is still rather strong.

4.10 – Tyrone Tracy Jr., RB, Purdue 

Jared: My favorite sleeper in this RB class. Tracy is a converted WR, so you know he has pass-catching chops. And he flashed as a runner last year, averaging 6.3 yards per carry and ranking fifth among 159 qualifying RBs in Pro Football Focus' Elusive Rating.

NFL.com's Lance Zierlein notably has Tracy graded as the fourth-best RB in the class.

4.11 – Javon Baker, WR, UCF

Jared: This former four-star recruit started his college career at Alabama before transferring to UCF. He led the Knights in receiving each of the past two seasons while averaging 17.9 yards per catch.

Baker has the potential to develop into a downfield weapon as a pro.

4.12 – Dylan Laube, RB, New Hampshire

Shane: Elite receiving back who can scoot down the sideline, Laube had a great Senior Bowl and solid Combine. He could find a 3rd down RB role and be a PPR option in the flex.

Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft – Round 5

5.01 – Cornelius Johnson, WR, Michigan

Kevin: Johnson wasn’t productive inside of Michigan’s run-heavy offense. So this is all about taking a chance on his athletic gifts. At nearly 6'3, 212 pounds, Johnson recorded a 4.44 forty – plus a 75th percentile vertical and an 83rd percentile broad jump.

5.02 – Ryan Flournoy Johnson, WR, Southeast Missouri State

Herms: Flournoy is a small school receiver from the FCS level who showed up to the Senior Bowl and was able to hang with D-I CBs. He was thoroughly impressive in that showcase and tested fairly well at the NFL Combine. He's probably only going to net Day 3 capital, but I'll be targeting him a lot in deeper rookie drafts.

5.03 – Cade Stover, TE, Ohio State

Matt: What's more fun than a fifth-round TE in a rookie draft? Stover delivers one of the highest agreement scores among 2024 prospects in the Draft Sharks Rookie Model (4.6 out of 5). That doesn't give him a stellar fantasy outlook, but it does make him a fairly safe bet.

High agreement means all the areas we measure line up in projecting Stover's outlook. And he sits a decent 31st in Model Score ahead of the NFL Draft. He's the 51st player off the board in this mock.

5.04 – Frank Gore Jr., RB, Southern Mississippi

Matt: Gore led his Southern Miss backfield all four seasons. That included more carries per game each year and 19+ receptions each of the past three seasons.

Gore earned top-30 PFF rushing grades each of the past two years and delivered a strong 3.65 yards after contact per attempt for his college career.

5.05 – Jamari Thrash, WR, Louisville

Alex: Thrash is a 6’0, 188-pound deep threat with more finesse to his game than anticipated. His main concern is his hands, with 8 drops in 2023 alone. 

5.06 – Daijun Edwards, RB, Georgia

Kevin: From 2020-2021, Edwards played behind guys like James Cook, Zamir White, and Kenny McIntosh. His workloads jumped over the past two seasons, where he showed well through contact and proved capable as a receiver.

I’ll consider it a win if the former four-star recruit goes in the middle of Day 3.

5.07 – Jha'Quan Jackson, WR, Tulane

Jared: Jackson contributed as a receiver, runner, and returner at Tulane -- which has proven to have some predictive power when projecting WRs to the next level. We'll see what kind of draft capital he gets, but there's shades of Wan'Dale Robinson to Jackson's game.

5.08 – Kendall Milton, RB, Georgia

Shane: If you can lead Georgia's backfield, there is a place for you in the NFL. Milton comes with a high pedigree and despite running a 4.62, he is explosive.

There is a chance he becomes a goal line RB and can vulture TDs in the NFL.

5.09 – Jawhar Jordan, RB, Louisville

Kevin: Jordan played ahead of Combine superstar Isaac Guerendo in 2023 (181 carries to 132). The result: 1,123 yards, 13 TDs, and a strong 90.7 PFF rushing grade.

His tape shows a smaller back (5’9, 193) with plus vision and cutting ability. We’ll see how much the size hurts him on draft day. In the right situation, though, I believe he can stick as a change-of-pace option.

5.10 – Rasheen Ali, RB, Marshall

Herms: It's a bummer that Ali ruptured his biceps tendon at the Senior Bowl. He's someone we won't have athletic testing numbers on because of this, but he is a smart and aggressive runner.

5.11 – Cody Schrader, RB, Missouri

Alex: He had a hyper-productive final year (1,803 total yards), leading the entire SEC in rushing. He carries decent size for the position (5’8 and 202 pounds) and even had decent receiving production.

Okay, what's the catch? It was his 6th collegiate year, and he will be 25 to start the NFL season.

5.12 – Luke McCaffrey, WR, Rice

Matt: Late-draft dart throw? Tough to argue with the son of longtime NFL receiver Ed McCaffrey and little bro to Christian. This McCaffrey tested well for speed (4.46-second 40 time) and athleticism (9.56 RAS, out of 10) at the Combine. He posted just two years of receiving production at Rice, but that's because McCaffrey hit college as a running QB.

When he finally went full wideout the past two seasons, McCaffrey easily led the team in receptions both years. And 2023 saw a huge jump in his reception, yardage, and TD market shares.

Now It's Your Turn

Your rookie draft is coming up, so make sure you're using the best cheat sheet in the business.

Create your customized Dynasty Draft War Room today.

More Dynasty Strategy

Join Matt Schauf and Jared Smola as they share the three main strategy points to becoming a successful dynasty player:

Your Personal Dynasty Analytics Department... We dig deeper for you.

We have the tools to help you manage your team like a real NFL GM. Coaches like Belichick, McVay, and Reid all have an entire analytics team at their disposal -- from Draft Night and through the offseason. Now you do too!

With tools that:

  1. Customize and sync to your league scoring. Plug-and-Play functionality.
  2. Auto-adjust during your draft(s) based on positional scarcity, player availability, and individual team needs.
  3. Look to the future with 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-yr projections.
  4. Contain detailed breakdowns for trade analysis, start-sit decisions, and waiver wire management.

We’ve built a whole suite of Dynasty Tools to help you draft, trade, and research like a champion. You're the manager. We're here to help.

Explore Your New Dynasty Tools »
Winning Your League Starts Here Trophy
Why Wouldn’t You Invest
$36 to Win Your League?
Check out thisleague-winning info
2024 Draft Package Now - Sept 15

$39

Get Instant Access
2024 In-Season Package Sept 5 - Mar 7

$39

Get Access Sept. 5
2024 DFS Package Sept 5 - Mar 7

$49

Get Access Sept. 5
Best Value – All Access Pass
DS Insider Membership All 3 Packages

$127 $36

Semi-annual
Get Instant Access
Draft War Room Included Draft War Room Draft War Room Draft War Room Included Draft War Room
Unlimited Live-Draft Sync Included Unlimited Live-Draft Sync Unlimited Live-Draft Sync Unlimited Live-Draft Sync Included Unlimited Live-Draft Sync
Award-Winning Player Rankings Included Award-Winning Player Rankings Award-Winning Player Rankings Award-Winning Player Rankings Included Award-Winning Player Rankings
3D Projections Included 3D Projections 3D Projections 3D Projections Included 3D Projections
In-Depth Player Profiles Included In-Depth Player Profiles In-Depth Player Profiles In-Depth Player Profiles Included In-Depth Player Profiles
Mock Draft Trainer Included Mock Draft Trainer Mock Draft Trainer Mock Draft Trainer Included Mock Draft Trainer
DMVP Trade Values Included DMVP Trade Values DMVP Trade Values DMVP Trade Values Included DMVP Trade Values
The Perfect Draft Included The Perfect Draft The Perfect Draft The Perfect Draft Included The Perfect Draft
Breakout & Comeback Player Included Breakout & Comeback Player Breakout & Comeback Player Breakout & Comeback Player Included Breakout & Comeback Player
Average Draft Position by Scoring Included Average Draft Position by Scoring Average Draft Position by Scoring Average Draft Position by Scoring Included Average Draft Position by Scoring
Scientific Injury Predictor Included Scientific Injury Predictor Scientific Injury Predictor Scientific Injury Predictor Included Scientific Injury Predictor
Insider Sleepers & Busts Included Insider Sleepers & Busts Insider Sleepers & Busts Insider Sleepers & Busts Included Insider Sleepers & Busts
In-Season Weekly Rankings In-Season Weekly Rankings Included In-Season Weekly Rankings In-Season Weekly Rankings Included In-Season Weekly Rankings
“Who Should I Start?” Tool “Who Should I Start?” Tool Included “Who Should I Start?” Tool “Who Should I Start?” Tool Included “Who Should I Start?” Tool
“Team Intel” Tool w/ Analysis & Notifications “Team Intel” Tool w/ Analysis & Notifications Included “Team Intel” Tool w/ Analysis & Notifications “Team Intel” Tool w/ Analysis & Notifications Included “Team Intel” Tool w/ Analysis & Notifications
Live-Sync Free Agent Finder Live-Sync Free Agent Finder Included Live-Sync Free Agent Finder Live-Sync Free Agent Finder Included Live-Sync Free Agent Finder
Trade Navigator Trade Navigator Included Trade Navigator Trade Navigator Included Trade Navigator
Player Shares Player Shares Included Player Shares Player Shares Included Player Shares
In-Depth Free Agent Gems In-Depth Free Agent Gems Included In-Depth Free Agent Gems In-Depth Free Agent Gems Included In-Depth Free Agent Gems
Buy/Sell/Hold Trade Advice Buy/Sell/Hold Trade Advice Included Buy/Sell/Hold Trade Advice Buy/Sell/Hold Trade Advice Included Buy/Sell/Hold Trade Advice
Strength-of-Schedule Data Strength-of-Schedule Data Included Strength-of-Schedule Data Strength-of-Schedule Data Included Strength-of-Schedule Data
DFS Lineup Builder DFS Lineup Builder DFS Lineup Builder Included DFS Lineup Builder Included DFS Lineup Builder
DFS Ownership Projections DFS Ownership Projections DFS Ownership Projections Included DFS Ownership Projections Included DFS Ownership Projections
Weekly Top Stacks Weekly Top Stacks Weekly Top Stacks Included Weekly Top Stacks Included Weekly Top Stacks
High-Stakes DFS Line-up Reviews High-Stakes DFS Line-up Reviews High-Stakes DFS Line-up Reviews Included High-Stakes DFS Line-up Reviews Included High-Stakes DFS Line-up Reviews
DFS Independent DFS Independent DFS Independent Included DFS Independent Included DFS Independent
Premium Insider Articles Included Premium Insider Articles Included Premium Insider Articles Included Premium Insider Articles Included Premium Insider Articles
Daily FF Email Updates Included Daily FF Email Updates Included Daily FF Email Updates Included Daily FF Email Updates Included Daily FF Email Updates
Breaking News Updates Included Breaking News Updates Included Breaking News Updates Included Breaking News Updates Included Breaking News Updates
To-the-Minute Game Day Inactives Included To-the-Minute Game Day Inactives Included To-the-Minute Game Day Inactives Included To-the-Minute Game Day Inactives Included To-the-Minute Game Day Inactives
All-Access Draft Sharks App All–Access Draft Sharks App Included All-Access Draft Sharks App Included All-Access Draft Sharks App Included All-Access Draft Sharks App Included All-Access Draft Sharks App
Get Instant Access Get Access Sept 5 Get Access Sept 5 Get Instant Access

Turn your phone into a draft weapon with our FREE APP

Download on the App Store Get It on Google Play